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Will I be able to stop taking Suboxone once I’m better?

We do not recommend patients stop taking buprenorphine/naloxone (Suboxone).

Addiction is a chronic, life-long medical disease. It is never “cured.” However, patients with addiction to opioids can lead a lifetime in recovery where they feel happy and fulfilled.

Buprenorphine/naloxone (Suboxone) helps start patients down a life-long recovery pathway. There is no rush (or need!) to ever come off Buprenorphine/naloxone (Suboxone). Since it stabilizes the opioid receptors, Buprenorphine/naloxone (Suboxone) prevents feelings of withdrawal, cravings, and prevents overdose. As soon as Buprenorphine/naloxone (Suboxone) is no longer “on board,” patients have a substantial chance of relapsing.

Hence, at Bicycle Health, we support the latest evidence-based recommendations that state that Buprenorphine/naloxone (Suboxone) should be taken “as long as it continues to benefit the patient.”

Just like diabetes medications and high blood pressure medications need to be taken every day to promote optimal health for patients with diabetes and hypertension, Buprenorphine/naloxone (Suboxone) should be taken every day if it helps patients with opioid addiction in their recovery.

Thus, while we do NOT recommend weaning off or detoxing from Buprenorphine/naloxone (Suboxone) we are (of course!) willing to work with each patient at the individual level to create a plan that understands and supports their treatment goals.

Rebekah L. Rollston, MD, MPH

Rebekah L. Rollston, MD, MPH, is a board-certified Family Medicine Physician and Head of Research at Bicycle Health. She earned her Medical Degree from East Tennessee State University Quillen College of Medicine (in the Rural Primary Care Track) and her Master of Public Health (MPH) from The George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health. Dr. Rollston completed her residency at Tufts University and Cambridge Health Alliance, a Harvard-affiliated community healthcare system in Greater Boston, with emphases in addiction medicine and sexual & reproductive health. Her professional interests focus on social determinants of health & health equity, addiction medicine, gender-based violence, sexual & reproductive health, rural health, homelessness & supportive housing, and immigrant health. Dr. Rollston has published on these topics in The Lancet, Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, American Journal of Health Promotion, Journal of Appalachian Health, and Medical Care.

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Rebekah L. Rollston, MD, MPH

Rebekah L. Rollston, MD, MPH, is a board-certified Family Medicine Physician and Head of Research at Bicycle Health. She earned her Medical Degree from East Tennessee State University Quillen College of Medicine (in the Rural Primary Care Track) and her Master of Public Health (MPH) from The George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health. Dr. Rollston completed her residency at Tufts University and Cambridge Health Alliance, a Harvard-affiliated community healthcare system in Greater Boston, with emphases in addiction medicine and sexual & reproductive health. Her professional interests focus on social determinants of health & health equity, addiction medicine, gender-based violence, sexual & reproductive health, rural health, homelessness & supportive housing, and immigrant health. Dr. Rollston has published on these topics in The Lancet, Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, American Journal of Health Promotion, Journal of Appalachian Health, and Medical Care.

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